BTerrell Group Blog

Look, Ma! No Cords!

Posted by Meredith Gooch on Mon, Sep 14, 2009

For a new and innovative technology to really take off, people need to a) be aware about it and b) understand the implications of adopting this new technology. Therefore, the purpose of my entry here is to create more buzz about a WONDERFUL and useful new technology that could really begin to change things for us - wireless electricity.

This is not a new idea by any means - it has been under ongoing research since the 1890's. But until now, it has not been safe or cheap enough to put on the market, according to CNN.com.

This wireless technology means that only a few years from now, we will no longer need power cords for our computers or even batteries. The environmental and energy-saving benefits and implications from using wireless electricity are enormous.  Use of electric cars may increase as "refueling" would simply mean driving onto a wireless power mat, rather than plugging in.

Of course, the technology is not yet ready to hit the markets - some kinks that need to be figured out include sending higher amounts of power over longer distances, rather than just several feet, as well as combining all devices onto one power pad, rather than using separate chargers for each device. Although these power pad sources would be plugged into electric sockets, these pads would still be more energy efficient than plugging each device directly into the power sockets. The devices would be placed on the mat to recharge.

Imagine the liberating feeling of picking up your laptop and moving it around without having to unplug cords or worry about remaining battery life. Imagine never using batteries again or worrying about their environmental impacts on Earth. Imagine all the extra "green" space you will have at your desk!

- Ruba Ayyat, Marketing

Source: Sutter, John. "A Cordless Future for Electricity." CNN.com September 2, 2009. <http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/09/02/wireless.electricity/index.html>

Tags: cordless electricity, wireless electricity